pull up

Do You Want to Improve and Master Pull Ups?

"Today was the day. No more bands, no more iso holds, no more eccentrics.

It was time for the real thing.

She approached the rack with a little zest (not entirely sure what song she had just listened to), stepped her way up to the pull-up bar, and grabbed hold for the ride.

Following a big breath and brace, she pulled as hard as she could and glided right up, pure euphoria spreading across her face as her chin passed the bar.

I thought she was going to perform a back flip off the rack. Instead she hopped down and gave me a huge high five — she had just crushed her first pull-up.

As trainers, it’s important to first ask the right questions and then move our clients down the path towards their goals. Many times, one of those goals will be to either do a single pull-up or just crush pull-ups period.

While the pull-up might look simple, it’s anything but that. There are many intricacies to be aware of if you hope to help your clients how to master pull ups. This article will walk you through everything from clearing someone to do a pull-up, to the biomechanics behind it, to the execution, programming, cueing and everything in-between..."

Want to read more?  Head on over to the Personal Trainer Development Center and check it out:

Do You Want to Improve and Master Pull Ups?

about the author

812f4cb124c2dda65e33a5f1c2f087ef.jpeg

James Cerbie is just a life long athlete and meathead coming to terms with the fact that he’s also an enormous nerd.  Be sure to follow him on Twitter and Instagram for the latest happenings.

5 Ways to Challenge Your Pull Up

Do you remember the first time you did a pull-up? It was like the stars lined up, the clouds parted and the sun shined down upon you in a magnificent ray of light. No? Well, that's how I felt. Granted, I was in first-grade when this took place, so maybe take that with a grain of salt.

Either way, pull-ups have been a staple in the gym for a long time, and most people are already doing them (or at least want to be able to do them). But once you conquer the elusive first pull-up, where do you go from there?

Obviously, you practice and keep working on the original because you want to get better, but there comes a time and place when you would like a little variety -- a way to do pull-ups that keeps you engaged and excited about going to the gym.

Here are five ways to add variety to your pull-ups and keep the challenge fresh:

Interested in reading more?  Click the link below and checkout the rest of the article over at Livestrong:

5 Ways to Challenge Your Pull Up

about the author

812f4cb124c2dda65e33a5f1c2f087ef.jpeg

James Cerbie is just a life long athlete and meathead coming to terms with the fact that he’s also an enormous nerd.  Be sure to follow him on Twitter and Instagram for the latest happenings.

Motor Potential, Technical Mastery and The Muscle Up

You either care about doing a muscle up, or you don’t. And either way is fine with me.

It’s a cool goal for some people, and something that doesn’t even register for others.

No matter where you fall on the matter, however, you’ll get something out of this article I just wrote for Breaking Muscle.

For starters, I go over the difference between motor potential and technical mastery, and explain why motor potential has to come first.  This is something everyone needs to understand.

I also lay out 2 four week programs that’ll get your pull up and dip really strong (#winning).

Be sure to check it out here:

The Key To Conquering the Elusive Muscle Up

Header Photo Credit:  Crossfit New England